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Mistakes We Made At Our First 9-To-5 Job | The Financial Diet



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Lauren & Chelsea discuss the mistakes they made at their first real jobs and what they learned along the way. Looking to make the most of your first career job? Check out this video:

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Tag: first job, the financial diet, chelsea fagan, lauren ver hage, personal finance, first job, mistakes, career, raise, asking, 9 to 5, speaking up, salary, negotiating, starting salary, perfect job, boundaries, e-mail, job mistakes to avoid, work life balance, how to make the most of your first job, first job advice, post grad advice

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50 Comments

  1. Want to know if a job offer is right for you? This video will tell you what questions to ask yourself before accepting: https://youtu.be/qGKlGvpB7lM.

    Reply
  2. Mistake nr 1: Calculate commute time.My first job was 4 hours traveling + 8 hours work= salary / 12 hours; waking up at 5 am and returning home exhausted.Its not worth it.Find a better LOCAL job.

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  3. Hey everyone 🙂
    If you just got your first Job, and you want to know more about the professional world, You can go and watch my video 🙂 Good luck everyone

    Reply
  4. Speaking of speaking up – I spoke up and was fired two weeks ago 🤣🤣 But hey no regrets! I'm glad I did! Don't kiss employer's ass people or we all will end up in a dictatorship!

    Reply
  5. Hey TFD,

    I started a new job as a dialysis nurse in April of this year, and after an adjustment period, I feel like I'm getting used to the job. Today, my preceptor showed me how to "validate" or do the paperwork. To my knowledge, out of ~10 nurses in the clinic, she's the only one doing this paperwork-heavy job. This is an issue because the clinic has a backlog. I don't mind learning and doing this. But I just wanted to know if this is good for me as an employee. One pro for this is me not being so expendable, but the negative thing is the stress re: backlogs/inconsistencies/would they let me go on vacation even with the backlog?

    Reply
  6. Cheers this was actually way more helpful than just "5 (cliche) tips to starting a new job"
    Your points were actually more grounded and added insight.

    Reply
  7. Did not negotiate lived in the city where minimum was 10 dollars but work was outside of the city so minimum there was 8.50 was not worth driving 30 minutes one way everyday

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  8. Negotiation really depends on your bargaining power. And for new grads, there's not much power there. I'd recommend researching the pay range of the job. Good companies will offer the average or above. Don't try to negotiate unless you actually have a competing offer. Especially for a not so critical entry level position, your replacement is quite abundant.

    Reply
  9. Again, please stop looking at each other unless you are not talking or indicating to the other that you are finished talking. It's very, very distracting. And, again, the advice is good; just work on your presentations.

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  10. The advice about respecting your own time so that others respect it too is spot on! Also, and this is very counterintuitive, throttle your performance don’t try too hard to impress, remember it’s a marathon and not a sprint. If you sprint during your first days your manager will expect you to sprint always and will evaluate your performance against the best performance you’ve shown.

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  11. Don't know why I came here expecting to cringe, but his was actually really good advice. Jeez, I seriously have an issue with judging people…

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  12. Ive always gotten something out of negotiation! If they get to the point of giving you an offer, they want to hire you, so why not ask?

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  13. My first “9-5” was actually 6:30–2:30 on a management track in food service. I made the terrible mistake of quitting my pain medication cold turkey and not communicating anything to my superiors. (Out of embarrassment of having chronic pain) My work performance and attitude dropped so much that I was taken off my management track and put on part time. Haven’t been able to get a steady job since. When I do, I have to be open about my physical limitations.

    Reply
  14. Here is what I tell my niece and nephew: from 18 – 25, your job is to figure out your job. During that time the first thing you should focus on is figuring out what you love to do and what you're good at. If you also manage to land right out of school in a career field that exploits those two things, if you have that kind of luck and self-knowledge early on, then YAHTZEE! That's great! But if you don't, don't beat yourself up. Keep looking.

    Reply
  15. I know this video is kind of "old", but I'm glad I found my way here. It helped me a lot. I just started my first job and had a lot of confusing thoughts about it.. Well but now I guess that's normal 😅

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  16. On the same negotiation spirit, my first mistake was not negotiating a clear path towards growth at my first job. My growth expectations and my boss' were completely different. I started as an editorial assistant and I was doing 80% of the whole editorial job myself, and I thought I could be considered for a promotion after a year or two since I pretty much knew how to get a magazine printed by myself in no time, but I still had 3 more years left to graduate, and my boss wasn't willing to promote me until I graduated. The fact that we had such different expectations and didn't discuss them before made the whole difference. I ended up getting frustrated and quitting.

    Reply
  17. Where I work, speaking up will get you punished. On the other hand, sucking up and not saying anything gets you promoted. What happens when management doesn't care about quality?

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  18. There's some contradictions to your videos: "not speaking up" when in your video about habits that won't fly after college it's "expressing you opinion". I'm not sure what kind of message you're coming across in this instance but contradictions this big should be addressed or cataloged so you're not contradicting yourselves.

    Reply
  19. im just starting to network and apply for internships do you guys have any tips and could you consider making a video about it for other people in the same situation?

    Reply
  20. I was so excited to get a job offer that i accepted and then was like "oh dang i should be getting the higher range of pay because of my experience". Then i went back and negotiated and she said one dollar more than she offered smh. I took it bc i need the job now. Its not horrible pay but definitely a few dollars lower than what most people get paid in my field. Thinking of quitting but i just started and i would love to use them on my resume ugh

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  21. After how many years of working a 9-5 job should someone start thinking about getting a promotion, not a salary increase but a higher position maybe from junior -> senior

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  22. Everyone "deserves" a cost of living raise. Everyone should consider a 0% raise in any given calendar year as a pay cut by the amount of inflation that year. And any raise you get, always adjust for the inflation rate that year to see what your actual raise is.

    Reply
  23. I just quit my first job after college yesterday coz i wasn't feeling it to be something i was passionate about… My friends later said that every first job is bad and u should have just gone with it… Did i do something wrong by quitting my job?

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  24. Negotiating salary on your first full-time job is not quite realistic. I've gone to multiple job interviews after college and always tried to negotiate my salary but more often than not, you're hit with the old, "You just don't have enough experience" and companies, more often than not, can always take the next person that's willing to do the job for the salary they offer. In this day and age, it's a lot harder for recent college graduates to negotiate salaries. It is way easier to negotiate a salary once you've gotten more "real life/job experience". Most companies already have the mentality that recent graduates are entitled to higher salary than what they actually deserve. Negotiating salary when one doesn't have enough experience under their belt just reinforces that. That's just my 2cents though.

    Reply
  25. whats a reasonable amount of money to ask for when asking for a raise I know going from 9$ an hour to 12$ would be a large jump and probably an unreasonable expectation so what is a good amount?

    Reply

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